Scale modelling tutorial: Upgrade the external fuel tank of a F6F Hellcat scale model.

 Upgrade the external fuel tank of a F6F Hellcat scale model.

Plastic scale modelling tutorial




In this scale modelling tutorial I am showing how I have upgraded the kit supplied external fuel tank of my Eduard 1/48 F6F Hellcat. You will see solutions for creating the center joint lip, the fuel cap, how to imitate dings and more.

Leave your comments in the comments box and don't forget to subscribe.




Tools needed:

- scalpel / hobby knife 
- drill bit and holder 
- scissors
- toothpick
- sanding stick and sandpaper
- pliers

Materials needed:
- super glue
- liquid cement
- plastic sheet and plastic rod  
- fishing line - 0.25mm

Thanks for watching this tutorial, stay tuned for more and subscribe to my YouTube channel
Best Regards and happy modeling
Metodi Metodiev


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Osprey Publishing "SR-71 Blackbird" by Paul F. Crickmore - book review

SR-71 Blackbird

by Paul F. Crickmore,  by Osprey Publishing

   This title from Osprey publishing covers the entire history of the iconic US Air Force reconnaissance airplane - the SR-71 Blackbird. Written by Paul F. Crickmore, this small size book offers very interesting information about fascinating subject. The book comes with hard cover and 160 glazed, thick and colorful pages 

"Lockheed's SR-71 Blackbird is one of the most iconic and famous jets ever built. Assembled in secret at Lockheed's Skunkworks, the Blackbirs's vital statistics remain phenomenal decades later. It holds the airspeed record for manned jet aircraft, operated at an altitude other aircraft could barely touch and was a marvel of technical engineering.

  Drawing on recent declassified material, leading SR-71 expert Paul Crickmore reveals the technical and operational history of one of the most fascinating aircraft, accompanied by a range of fantastic illustrations, photographs and facts about the world's most secret spy plane."

   Reading those few lines on the back of the book few keywords popped immediately - Skunkworks and recently declassified. 


Contents   

List of abbreviations - 6
Introduction - 8
Chronology - 11
A-12 Design and Manufacture - 16
A-12 Oxcart Operations - 40
Tagboard and Senior Bowl, tha M-21/D-21 - 60
Kedlock, the YF-12A - 66
Senior Crown - SR-71 - 80
Flying the SR-71 - 108
NASA Operations - 128
Surviving Aircraft Histories - 136
Appendices - 151
Index - 159



List of abbreviations

    The book starts with the list of abbreviations. This list is not only necessary to read the book but is also a valuable tool in the world of military aviation.

Introduction

    In this part the author introduces the reader to the complex situation of the Cold War and the mood of the era. Here you can also get a closer look at the events that led to start of Project Rainbow.

Chronology

    This section marks notable events throughout the lifespan of the aircraft, from August 1956, when project Rainbow begins in an attempt to render the U-2 "invisible to Soviet radar", trough February 29, 1964 when President Lyndon B. Johnson announces the existence of the "A-11"(A-12) program to October 9th 1999 when NASA's crew Roger Smith and Bob Meyer fly SR-71A 61-7980 on the type's final ever flight at the Edwards AFB Open Day.

A-12 Design and Manufacture

   In this chapter you can learn very interesting facts about the design and construction difficulties, problems and solutions. It is divided and makes in-depth overview on the following sections - Manufacture, Layout and Stealth, Engine, Fuel System, Air Inlet Control System (AICS), Internal Navigation System (INS), Cameras, ELINT, ECM and Crew Survival Systems  

A-12 Oxcart Operations

In this chapter we can reed about the flight and operational history of the A-12 Oxcart and includes the following sections - Loses, Vietnam and The Pueblo Affair. 

Tagboard and Senior Bowl, the M-21/D-21

    Following the loss of Power's U-2 and the US government's decision to discontinue maned flights over the Soviet Union, the Skunk Works received authorization to begin studies of the feasibility of producing a Mach 3 plus unpiloted platform, or drone, for the CIA on October 10, 1962.  This chapter tells the story of the M-21/D-21.

Kedlock, the YF-12A

In October 1962, the Air Force ordered three interceptor variants to replace the cancelled F-108A Rapier. The modified A-12, first designated the AF-12 and then the YF-12A, was designed and built under a project codenamed KEDLOCK. The aircraft’s mission was to intercept new Soviet supersonic bombers long before they reached the United States. It carried three air-to-air missiles and a second crewman who worked the fire control system. The Air Force initially envisioned a fleet of as many as 100, but only three were built and delivered during 1963-64. In this chapter you can read all about the development and the faith of the project.



Senior Crown - SR-71

   In this chapter we come to the SR-71,  In December 1962, the Air Force ordered six “reconnaissance/strike” aircraft for high-speed, high-altitude flights over hostile territory after a nuclear attack—hence its original designator RS. Compared to the A-12, the SR-71 was about six feet longer, weighed 15,000 pounds more fully loaded, had more prominent nose and body chines and a two-seat cockpit, and carried additional optical and radar imagery systems and ELINT sensors in interchangeable noses. With the added weight, the aircraft flew slower and lower than the A-12 or the YF-12A, but it carried more fuel and had a longer range. Here you will find several very interesting sections and events - Program Cancellation?, Flight Test, Attrition and Lessons, Operations, Yom Kippur, Detachment 4, North Korea and Program Termination.

Flying the SR-71

    In this chapter we can find out what does it take and what is it like to have the control over the SR-71.

NASA Operations

   This chapter goes trough what NASA used this aircraft for.

Surviving Aircraft Histories

Here you will find brief description and a picture of each surviving aircraft.

Appendix

There are 4 appendixes - 1: Specifications, 2: Blackshield missions log, 3: Losses, 4: World speed and altitude records.

                    



Conclusion

As a fan of this aircraft, for me this is a very valuable book. The quality of the print, the information inside, the rare pictures and beautiful profiles and cut offs make this book a great addition to any aircraft enthusiast library.

Best regards
Metodi Metodiev

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Is scale modelling stuff overpriced? Part I - compressors.

Is scale modelling stuff overpriced?


Part I - compressors 

   In first glance some items doesn't seem to be that expensive. A jar of my favorite Mr.Hobby paints is 1.99$ (without shipping) in LuckyModel. That's about the same as in my local hobby shop. You see 1.99$ is OK price to me but when you actually realize that this is 10ml container things get interesting. Convert that 1.99$ for 10ml to $ for liter... amazing isn't it... this paint cost  199 USD per liter (33.814 US fluid ounces), MRP costs about the same.  Ok, a jar of paint goes a long way so no one really cares. What about something else, something a bit more expensive?
     
      In this article I will compare several scale modeler targeting compressors with some general purpose oil-less compressors.
     The prices of the  Iwata and Sparmax units as well as the technical information about them comes from www.air-craft.net. The prices of the general purpose compressors is also from online stores. Prices does not include shipping costs.

So here are the contenders:
In the "scale modeler specific" (SMS for short) corner we have the: 

Sparmax TC-610H Plus 



Product info from the manufacturer: 
Updated model of the popular TC-610H airbrush compressor, featuring a new case design with top mounted pressure adjustment, pressure gauge & removable twin airbrush holders.
Just like the previous TC-610H, the TC-610H Plus is a powerful, quite & reliable oil free automatic single piston airbrush compressor fitted with a 2.5L air tank. 
The TC-610H Plus is automatic - when the air tank pressure falls below 40psi, the compressor runs to recharge the tank back to 60psi & then switches off - the compressor running to the demand of the air tank, rather than switching on/off every time the airbrush trigger is pressed.
The TC-610H Plus is enclosed in a sturdy steel case with carrying handle, case top mounted adjustable pressure regulator / moisture filter, output pressure gauge & two removable airbrush holders. The pressure regulator has 2 x 1/8" BSP-P air outlets (1 x blanking cover included) & is supplied with 1 x 3.0M braided air hose with 1/8" BSP-P fittings. 

Sparmax TC-620X 

Product info from the manufacturer: 
Powerful oil free automatic twin piston airbrush compressor with a 2.5L air tank, the TC-620X has ample power for any airbrushing task & with its 2.5L air tank provides smooth & consistent airflow.
Being automatic, when the TC-620X's air tank pressure falls below 40psi, the compressor runs to recharge the tank back to 60psi & then switches off - the compressor running to the demand of the air tank, rather than switching on/off every time the airbrush trigger is pressed.

The TC-620X is enclosed in a sturdy steel case with carrying handle & is fitted with top panel mounted adjustable pressure regulator / moisture filter, output pressure gauge, twin airbrush holders & air tank mounted pressure gauge. The pressure regulator has 2 x 1/8" BSP-P air outlets (1 x blanking cover included) & is supplied with 2 x 3.0M braided 1/8" BSP-P air hoses. 

Iwata Power Jet Lite

Product info from the manufacturer: 
Featuring a powerful twin-pump, 1/6 Hp motor, the Power Jet Lite compressor is equipped with a pressure regulator for precise adjustment of airflow. Built with Iwata's Smart Technology, it automatically shuts off when not in use. Economically priced, the Power Jet Lite doesn't have a tank reservoir, yet delivers ample power. Like all Iwata Studio Series compressors, the Power Jet Lite comes complete with an airhose and adapters so it can hook up to most brands of airbrush.
The Power Jet Lite is a zero maintenance oil-free twin piston compressor that features an adjustable pressure regulator with gauge & moisture filter, a protective steel case with carrying handle & integrated airbrush holder

Iwata Power Jet Pro 

Product info from the manufacturer:
Featuring a powerful, zero maintenance, oil-free twin piston 1/6HP motor, the Power Jet Pro compressor is equipped with twice the features of the Power Jet Lite, with two air pressure regulators for precise adjustment of airflow at two individual workstations. 
Built with Iwata's Smart Technology, it automatically shuts off when not in use. Everything is contained in the Power Jet Pro's protective steel case with integrated carrying handle.

The Power Jet Pro's 2L air tank effectively removes airflow pulsation, helps air cooling, which gives better moisture separation & can act as an air reserve for higher pressure spraying. 


In the "general purpose" (GP for short) corner we have the:

Black&Decker BD 55/6

Product info from the manufacturer:
Compact control panel
Lightweight and easy to carry thanks to the convenient handle
Maintenance free pump
Direct Driven Oilless Compressor

The suction cup feet ensure excellent stability

Black&Decker BD 195/24V

Product info from the manufacturer:
24-litre sleek vertical tank
Compact ON/OFF button
Versatile and easy to use, ideal for all hobby and semi-professional applications
External pump for better cooling
Direct Driven Oilless Compressor
Compact machine

Easy to handle thanks to the built-in metal handle

Stanley D 200/8/6

Stanley D 200/10/24V


To help you compare those compressors I have created a table where different parameters can be compared:





At this point this comparison is going to be based on numbers only. I do have a generic airbrushing compressor with DIY tank so I have a good Idea on how this type of compressors work and what are their drawbacks.

So lets start with the price. In general the Sparmax and Iwata are significantly more expensive than their general purpose counterparts with the BD 55/6 being the cheapest and Iwata being out of their minds. 

Tank capacity. The GPs win this round effortlessly. The Iwata Jet Lite doesn't even have a tank... for 330 USD. 

Flow. Having larger tanks, the GPs need the higher flow to fill them in timely manner. You may need a extra flow regulator in order to supply your airbrush correctly. 

Max. Pressure. GPs win again with 8 and 10 bar vs the 4.8 maximum of the Iwata Power Jet Pro.

Noise. Here things turn around and the SMS win and they win with quite a margin. Further more the noise levels of the Stenleys is quite desturbing. The Black & Decker 55/6 is more acceptable and I couldn't find info about the 195/24. 
     On the other hand the big capacity compressors give you the opportunity to spray with your airbrush for sufficient time with one fill thus in total silence (compressor is shut down).

Weight. Here we have some surprising results. The lightest is the TC-610H, then comes the Iwata Jet lite, which is strange as it doesn't have a tank. Next come the two 6 l. GP compressors, which is also surprising given the fact that they have bigger tanks that have to sustain bigger pressure. As expected, the two 24 l. ones are the heaviest of the pack .

Dimmensions. The SMS compressors are more compact, but the GPs are not that much bigger.

Connectivity. No, none of them can connect to your smart phone. Instead, with both Sparmaxes you can connect your airbrush using two 1/8'' connectors via 3 m, 1/8'' braided hose which comes with the compressor. Both Iwatas have 1/4'' male connectors. The Jet Pro comes with a hose with 1/8'' connector on the airbrush side.  
   The general purpose compressors come with 1/2'' quick release connectors so they need some extra hardware to fit the airbrush hose.
   
My conclusions. From my perspective as someone who is on the market for a new compressor, I am very tempted by the 24 l. Black & Decker. As I have the little extra space the bigger tank needs my only concern remain the noise level. Although I can surely use it in "silent" mode I still need to hear how loud is it wile working. Another positive about the general purpose compressors is that I can go to the store and buy it, not having to pay for shipping and wait for who knows how long.
   As far as the scale modelling oriented compressors, frankly I think that they are overpriced. Ok, you get airbrush holders on the case... come on, who on the face of this planet will put his airbrush on the case of working compressor?
    Even with the extra bit of hardware that you will need the GPs remain much better priced. 

Other options. Of course there are plenty of other options out there. The generic 1/5 hp compressors with tank are around 80 USD without shipping on ebay. My experience with this type, although without a tank, shows that they can generate a lot of heat, thus overheating easily.
  Also if you search for "silent compressor" on ebay you will find nicely looking 65 db, 10 l. 8 bar compressor from Latvia. It costs 146 USD without shipping and is made by AlfaTek (or at least that is what the sticker on the tank says).
This option seems legit and surely deserves attention.  

I hope that this article will help you to choose a compressor.
Best regards
Metodi Metodiev


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Masking scale model canopies inside and out - video tutorial

Masking scale model canopies inside and out. 

How to create DIY masks from masking tape - video tutorial 

In this plastic scale modelling video tutorial you will see how I mask and paint the canopies of my scale models using DIY masks made of masking tape. You will also see the visual impact painting from the inside as well as from the outside have on the appearance of a plastic scale model.




Tools needed:
- tweezers
- scalpel / hobby knife 
- ruler 
- scissors
- toothpick

Materials needed:
- masking tape
- masking liquid
- paint 


Thanks for watching this tutorial, stay tuned for more and subscribe to my YouTube channel
Best Regards and happy modeling
Metodi Metodiev


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Building the Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 scale model - Roden, 1/144

Building the Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6


Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

  Roden plastic scale model in 1/144 scale, kit number 304


1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - History

The Douglas DC-6 is a piston-powered airliner and transport aircraft built by the Douglas Aircraft Company from 1946 to 1958. Originally intended as a military transport near the end of World War II, it was reworked after the war to compete with the Lockheed Constellation in the long-range commercial transport market. More than 700 were built and many still fly today in cargo, military, and wildfire control roles.
The DC-6B, originally powered by Double Wasp engines with Hamilton Standard 43E60 constant-speed reversing propellers, was regarded as the ultimate piston-engine airliner from the standpoint of ruggedness, reliability, economical operation, and handling qualities.
Delta airlines operated the Douglas DC-6B from Dec. 01, 1948 to Dec. 11, 1968 when it was time for this legendary propeller driven airliner to make place for the jet age.

1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - Assembly

           I started this build from the wings. They come in three piece assembly, with single lower piece and two upper pieces. I glued those together using Humbrol’s liquid poly. The ailerons and part of the flaps are molded on the upper wing pieces resulting thin trailing edge without seam line after assembly. Another nice feature of the single piece lower wing is the molded in dihedral.
             I decided to build this model in gear up configuration and therefore felt the need for livening it up a bit. Part of my plan was to cut the flaps and place them in lowered position. Before cutting them I inserted appropriate pieces of plastic inside each wing in order to retain the structural rigidity of the original assembly. Then, using RB saws I cut the flaps. The gap between the lower and upper wing parts was filled and shaped with Milliput. The front part of the flaps was also filled with Milliput and shaped with sandpaper. To better accommodate the flaps in the wing I thinned the plastic of the upper wing substantially. Later, using a saw I created slots in the flaps to house the hinges. 

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

           To close the gear bays I first tried using the covers that come with the kit. The fit was very bad so instead I used Milliput again. Then I scribed the panel lines using needle in a pin vice.

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

Another disappointing aspect of this kit was the detail on the engine cowlings and nacelles. The intakes were blank, the radiator door was not existent so were the exhaust stacks.  To open up the intakes I used my photo etched saw then folded 800 grit sanding paper to get close to the correct shape. Having four engines, with two intakes each, was real mojo drainer. 
Next were the exhaust stacks. First I drilled a holes in the cowling and then shaped the holes and the nacelles with square file. To make the exhausts I drilled holes in lengths of circular rod then squashed them a bit with pliers to get oval shape. I cut them to desired angle then installed them in pairs in their beds. 
To represent the radiator heat outlets first I cut the plastic that was blanking this area using a saw. Then I assembled the engines, the fit was somewhat mediocre as quite a lot of dry fit and sanding was needed to get the engine faces inside the two cowling parts. After some careful trimming of the outlet opening I glued square plastic stock on the radiator side and another one on the wing side. Then I connected those walls with a sheet plastic piece creating a ramp. The radiator outlet door was also made from sheet plastic and Mr. Hobby Cement S.
 To conclude the job on the engine cowlings and nacelles I fixed some gaps along the seamlines using superglue and scribed some panel lines. After that I attached the engines to the wings. Again the fit was not very good. On the outer engines I got away with small amount of Mr. Dissolved Putty and sanding. The wheel wells are part of the inner engine pair nacelles and these nacelles were with different shape than the outer ones. Unfortunately all four engines had the same shape which lead to big step. To overcome this issue I temporarily attached the engines with drop of super glue and traced their outline on the wing part of the nacelle. Then I broke of the engines and shaped the nacelles using files. After the shape was fair enough I cemented the inner engine pair in place. Again using Mr. Dissolved Putty I blended the nacelle parts together. Same was done for the outer pair.



Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

           To finish the wings sub-assembly I scratch built the intake that is located almost in the center of the aircraft’s bottom.

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

            Now, having the wing assembly ready it was time to pay attention to the fuselage. It is divided in two, lengthwise, with the nose and the canopy being separate parts. Here the gear bay was closed using Milliput just like on the wings. The assembly was glued with Mr.Cement S. Some Mr. Dissolved putty was required on the nose joint as well as on the spinal joint. The tail was molded with the complete rudder on the left fuselage halve and this resulted in small step after I assembled the halves. I filled it with plastic strip, sanded it smooth and rescribed the panel lines. Plastic strips were also used on the nose, to correct its shape. 

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

          Due to the fact that I removed portion of the wings to represent the dropped flaps, two significant openings needed to be blanked off. The top portion was built with Milliput prior to wings installation and the sides from plastic strips once everything was in place.

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6  scale model

         The wings to fuselage assembly required some minor adjustments but resulted in good fit and small gaps to fill. The wing root joints were more prominent than those on the lower fuselage side. All was dealt with tinted CA glue. After sanding the results were very good. The same CA glue mixture was used to fill the joint between the horizontal stabilizers and the tail section. To finalize the assembly stage I rescribed the panel lines on the fuselage. I also used CA glue to fill various gaps on the entire model. A tutorial on how to facilitate CA glue you can find here!

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale modelDelta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model  Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model

1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - Prep and paint


            The preparation of the model for the painting stage started with a good cleaning with IPA. Next I applied Mr. Surfacer 1500 diluted with Mr. Levelling Thinner. The primer gave me smooth coat with just a few spots to do some sanding on. 

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Finishing Surfacer 1500   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Finishing Surfacer 1500   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Finishing Surfacer 1500 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Finishing Surfacer 1500   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Finishing Surfacer 1500

          Next step was to apply gloss white on the top of the fuselage. That was done using Mr. Color C01 diluted with Mr. Levelling thinner. This combination gives really good gloss surface. At this point I decided to try how the decals will work before I continue with the rest of the work on this scale model. 

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Color C01 Mr. Leveling Thinner   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Color C01 Mr. Leveling Thinner Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Color C01 Mr. Leveling Thinner   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Mr. Color C01 Mr. Leveling Thinner

           I masked the white and proceeded towards the blue paint that covers the engine nacelles, part of the wings and part of the nose of the aircraft. I mixed my own colour trying to be as close as possible to the blue on the decals. The blue parts were subsequently masked.

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model

                The lower surfaces of the fuselage and the complete wings (without the blue parts) are supposed to be in natural metal finis (NMF). I wanted to try to achieve some panelling effect using only one metallic shade and various underlying surfaces. I attempted marble coat with gloss black on the outer wings and on the forward and rear fuselage sections. With matt black I primed the inner wings and the center fuselage section of the aircraft. 


Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model


            The NMF paint that I used was Alclad II “Chrome for Lexan”. I applied it in several thin coats and kind of achieved the desired effect. After some masking, a layer of the alclad peeled not from the primer or from the plastic but from another layer of alclad. I had to do some sanding to get rid of the ridges and then re-applied more alclad. To finish with the NMF I sealed it with “Sealer for Metalizer” from Humbrol. For me this is the best product for sealing NMF.
        To paint the black radome I masked around it with thin masking tape and then extended the mask with masking putty.

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model

1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - Decaling


            The decals are not the best I ever used. They are very hard and brittle. Furthermore they are not reacting very much to decal solutions. This time I used Mr. Mark softer Neo because I ran out of my preferred Agama Hypersol. Also the decals had some geometrical/size discrepancies with the panel lines – like the rear door position. The red line above the cockpit windows I joined using paintbrush. Finally, after the decals were in place they were sealed with Mr. Super clear III.

1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - Weathering

            
           There is not so much weathering on this aircraft but as any operational machine some dirt and grime accumulate during its work. I airbrushed exhaust stains after the exhaust stacks and made some streaks after the hinges on the ailerons and flaps. Also I did some post shading on the lower, front panel lines of the fuselage with much thinned black paint. The idea was to have the post shading on the forward edge of each panel. For this I masked along each panel line and sprayed a faint “dirt” toward the rear of the aircraft.

1/144 Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6 - Display base


              The display base is comprised of several products. First there is the plastic display stand that comes as Zvezda kit Nr: 2735. That was painted with AK 480 Extreme Metal “Dark Aluminium”. Then we have a cheap photo frame. And finally there is a part of contemporary brochure issued by Delta airlines. Putting those together gave nice overall appearance in inflight configuration.   


Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model

Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model   Delta Airlines Douglas DC-6, 1/144  scale model

That's all for this build, stay tuned for more and subscribe to my YouTube channel
Best Regards and happy modeling
Metodi Metodiev


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